WOMEN’S WORLD CUP TAKES CENTRE STAGE

26th June 2019

A bucketload of goals, multiple records broken, plenty of late drama and a deluge of VAR controversy – it’s been a fantastic Women’s World Cup so far.
 
As we head into the closing stages of the competition, we’ve already seen the 2019 edition become the UK’s most viewed women’s football tournament on television – the 17.2 million people that watched the group stages eclipsing the 12.4 million total set for the whole of the 2015 tournament.

If that wasn’t impressive enough, the global TV record looks set to be smashed. Some 750 million people watched the Women’s World Cup four years ago; FIFA estimates that nearly one billion could tune in this summer.
 
Add to the mix more than one million tickets having already been sold for the matches around France, with both semi-finals and the final having long been sold out, it’s clear the 2019 Women’s World Cup marks another milestone moment in the ascendancy of women’s football.
 
The prize money on offer for teams competing at this year’s tournament, at $30 million, has doubled compared to the 2015 edition – though great strides clearly still need to be taken in order to close the gap on the ludicrously lucrative world of the men’s game. 
 
Sponsors have also expressed a greater desire to be involved with women’s football than ever before.
 
England alone headed into this summer’s tournament with the backing of Boots, BT, Budweiser, Continental, Head & Shoulders and Lucozade, while Visa has launched its biggest ever sponsorship activation for a women’s football event across 33 individual markets.
 
Adidas has announced it will be awarding its sponsored players the same amount in bonuses as their male counterparts should they end up lifting the trophy in July.
 
Nike, meanwhile, has proven its commitment to women’s sport, throwing its full weight behind the tournament, having made bespoke home and away kits for 14 of the 24 teams competing in France this summer. Each kit is made from 12 recycled plastic bottles.
 
As part of the brand’s activity around the Women’s World Cup, Nike will also be collaborating with JD Sports to help stage the JD Football Festival – a female-focused event ALTER has curated, helped design and will be producing and managing on the day.
 
Taking place in the French capital on June 28 at Flow Paris, in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower and on the banks of the Seine, JD and Nike will be using the power of sport to bring people together.
 
With football freestyling, DJ workshops, hip hop yoga, a live performance from French pop star Aya Nakamura and a screening of the huge Women’s World Cup quarter-final between hosts France and holders United States on offer, 600 lucky consumers are set to be engaged, absorbed and inspired by women’s football. 
 
Given what we’ve seen so far at the Women’s World Cup, they won’t be the only ones this summer.
 

Chinese brands to the world cup rescue

WOMEN’S WORLD CUP TAKES CENTRE STAGE

 

26th June 2019

Chinese brands to the world cup rescue

A bucketload of goals, multiple records broken, plenty of late drama and a deluge of VAR controversy – it’s been a fantastic Women’s World Cup so far.
 
As we head into the closing stages of the competition, we’ve already seen the 2019 edition become the UK’s most viewed women’s football tournament on television – the 17.2 million people that watched the group stages eclipsing the 12.4 million total set for the whole of the 2015 tournament.
 
If that wasn’t impressive enough, the global TV record looks set to be smashed. Some 750 million people watched the Women’s World Cup four years ago; FIFA estimates that nearly one billion could tune in this summer.
 
Add to the mix more than one million tickets having already been sold for the matches around France, with both semi-finals and the final having long been sold out, it’s clear the 2019 Women’s World Cup marks another milestone moment in the ascendancy of women’s football.
 
The prize money on offer for teams competing at this year’s tournament, at $30 million, has doubled compared to the 2015 edition – though great strides clearly still need to be taken in order to close the gap on the ludicrously lucrative world of the men’s game. 
 
Sponsors have also expressed a greater desire to be involved with women’s football than ever before.
 
England alone headed into this summer’s tournament with the backing of Boots, BT, Budweiser, Continental, Head & Shoulders and Lucozade, while Visa has launched its biggest ever sponsorship activation for a women’s football event across 33 individual markets.
 
Adidas has announced it will be awarding its sponsored players the same amount in bonuses as their male counterparts should they end up lifting the trophy in July.
 
Nike, meanwhile, has proven its commitment to women’s sport, throwing its full weight behind the tournament, having made bespoke home and away kits for 14 of the 24 teams competing in France this summer. Each kit is made from 12 recycled plastic bottles.
 
As part of the brand’s activity around the Women’s World Cup, Nike will also be collaborating with JD Sports to help stage the JD Football Festival – a female-focused event ALTER has curated, helped design and will be producing and managing on the day.
 
Taking place in the French capital on June 28 at Flow Paris, in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower and on the banks of the Seine, JD and Nike will be using the power of sport to bring people together.
 
With football freestyling, DJ workshops, hip hop yoga, a live performance from French pop star Aya Nakamura and a screening of the huge Women’s World Cup quarter-final between hosts France and holders United States on offer, 600 lucky consumers are set to be engaged, absorbed and inspired by women’s football. 
 
Given what we’ve seen so far at the Women’s World Cup, they won’t be the only ones this summer.
 

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2019-06-26T16:33:33+01:00